Gender pay gap

The gender pay gap is a high level indicator of the difference between women and men’s earnings. The gender pay gap compares the median hourly earnings of women and men in full and part-time work.

In 2014, there was a gender pay gap of 9.9 percent.

Since the late 1990s the gender pay gap has been steadily reducing (see the table below). However, women still earn significantly less than men. Causes of the gender pay gap include occupational segregation,  unconscious bias in the workforce and lack of flexible work. These factors, and the hours women work (one in three women work less than 30 hours per week) meant that in 2014 women earned $300 less per week than men.

Year

Gender pay gap
(Median hourly
earnings)

2014 9.9%
2013 10.1%
2012 9.3%
2011 9.6%
2010 10.6%
2009 11.3%
2008 13.0%
2007 11.8%
2006 12.5%
2005 14.2%
2004 12.7%
2003 12.4%
2002 12.3%
2001 13.1%
2000 14.3%
1999 15.5%
1998 16.5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Statistics New Zealand: New Zealand Income Survey

The median is used because it is less likely to be skewed by very high wages. It is also used internationally.